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About Town / Neighborhoods / South Hingham

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South Hingham

Liberty Pole

Liberty Pole

Bring a compass, a map, a phone, breadcrumbs -- anything so you won’t get lost. Liberty Pole is one of Hingham’s first “developments” but that really isn’t the impression you get. Although it’s quite large, it has a nice “small neighborhood” feel with rolling hills, lovely pinewoods, and mature plantings that don’t shout development. Consisting of streets like Pilgrim, Puritan, Volunteer, Flintlock, Hancock and Independence Lane, I think you can get where they were going with this. With a vast range of home prices, most homes are either capes or colonials, in keeping with the New England feel. Many people that commute by car prefer this South Hingham location for its easy access to Route 3. Oh, and the trick to “The Pole”? Find a yellow line painted on the street, follow it and you’re out and on your way.

Prospect Area

Prospect Neighborhood

Prospect Street itself is a short cut from South Hingham to Norwell, the neighboring town to the south. The wide flat boulevard has many offshoot streets like Forest Lane, Craig Lane and Amber Road that create comfortable neighborhoods with mixed housing built between the 1950’s and 1970’s. There is easy outdoor play space for kids riding bikes or playing kick-the-can, and like so much of South Hingham, the proximity to Route 3 is a draw.

Scotland Area

Scotland Area

This neighborhood is very similar in feel to Prospect, but you can’t get to Norwell from here; in via Main Street, out via Main Street, that makes it a bit less traveled. Homes along Scotland Street are a mix of decades from 1920 to recent builds. Kid friendly, close to Route 3, as with most of South Hingham, you get more bang for your buck here than you do in neighborhoods closer to town.

Gardner Street

Gardner Street

Gardner Street is a fairly busy street because it connects Main Street to Route 53, to Route 3, a short cut of sorts for South Hingham commuters. But because it is a winding narrowish street the feel is actually more like a winding country lane than well-traveled cut through. The houses on Gardner Street are, for the most, part set well back from the road on large flat lots surrounded by towering pines adding to the aforementioned country feel. The homes are charming, and unique, and then there’s the proximity to Routes 53 and 3, making Gardner well worth a look.

Upper Gardner

Upper Gardner

Upper Gardner is a continuance of that same winding lane, but across the major connecting road Route 53, making it just a little isolated from the rest of town. This area has everything you would find in South Hingham, charming capes on wide quiet streets and cul-de-sacs, and even some waterfront homes where you can paddle around on Accord Pond. It’s close to the amenities of 53, The Derby Street Shoppes, Route 3 and---wait for it--- Kress Field also known as the mystery field that no one can find.

Black Rock

Black Rock

You know how I said South Hingham usually gets you more for your money? Well Black Rock is the exception to the rule. A planned, gated community of large shingle homes nicely sited alongside the golf course and clubhouse. Memberships, which allow use of the 18 hole golf course, pools, tennis and paddle courts, fitness rooms and clubhouse, are purchased separately with or without home ownership. Nicely built, almost-Craftsman-style homes have high ceilings, open floor plans, and lots of windows. Units can be customized with details and finished basements depending on how much over the list price you care to spend. Some phases are still in construction so there is time to customize. All the homes have similar exteriors so don’t be surprised if you come home from the company Christmas party and try your key in the wrong door.

Maryknoll

Maryknoll/Saw Mill/Mast Hill

These developments are three cul-de-sacs adjacent to one other, but built at different times and each with their own atmosphere. Mast Hill is lush with large native plants and towering pines. Houses are classic 1960’s with some of the more modern ones slowly being remodeled. Saw Mill is more open, and more manicured than Mast Hill with larger homes built in the 1980’s Colonial style. Then there is Maryknoll. Built on a hill where a Catholic Seminary once stood, this land was purchased and developed into a neighborhood of high-end homes in 2004. Wind up the hill on a wide boulevard to find large homes set back from the street. The open landscape and the similarity of build belies their size- they are very large and quite pricey, but each house has its own features that make it unique - from stone detail to custom designed windows. In any one of the “Hills” you’ll find kids galore--- with neighborhood Halloween parties and a bus stop so packed that it requires its own bus it’s no wonder families flock here.

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